Why plant rosebushes at the end of vine rows?

rosebushes vineyardLast week we explained why some winemakers let grass grow between the vines. This week iDealwine are on hand to explain another common feature of the vineyard: roses. Aside from looking splendid rosebushes can be a winemaker’s great friend.

An early warning system

Roses and vines can be susceptible to the same diseases such as powdery mildew that can have disastrous effects on a winemaker’s crop. Some cultivars of roses are particularly sensitive to powdery mildew and are often the first plant to become infected. Rosebushes around the perimeter of a vineyard thus keep the winemaker alert to the infiltration of this terrible disease, taking the necessary action to save the crop before disease spreads.

Powdery mildew is one of the most devastating diseases for the vine and no vineyard in France is safe from an outbreak. Humidity helps the disease spread and one of the signs of an infected vine is white felting on the foliage and grapes.

mildew

Help for the horses

Another reason for the presence of roses harks back to the days when horses and oxen were commonly used to plough the vineyards. Rosebushes at the end helped the animals navigate the vine rows. Attracted by the bright colours of the petals, the animals knew this to be the end of the row. The thorns also prevented them from cutting corners when they reached the end of a row and damaging the vines.

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Other things to read on the iDealwine blog:

Bordeaux wines now contain three times fewer pesticides than less than 4 years ago

Biodynamic, organic, sustainable?

Interview with Jean-Michel Comme (Pontet-Canet): « the vineyard is my one true passion »

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