Mature vintages | Making great moments

There are so many reasons to appreciate mature vintages. Having made such wines our speciality, we consider ourselves well placed to tell you all about them. And a little reminder won’t do any harm, especially at the point of replenishing our stock. There is no need to wait any longer, it’s high time you found something you’ll love.

1 – Perfect for wine-lovers who don’t have a cellar

As the aficionados we are, we understand your frustration at not being able to keep the wines you love so much – whether because of a lack of space or less-than-optimal storing conditions. Fortunately, you can find just what you’re looking for on iDealwine’s fixed price sale. But what should you buy that can be enjoyed soon? Aim for the essentials and opt for emblematic regions like Bordeaux where you’ll find crus classes (Châteaux La Mission Haut-Brion and Léoville-Poyferré) as well as delicious crus bourgeois at more accessible prices (a 2000 Château-Haut-Marbuzet, for example). In Burgundy, you’ll be tempted by the elegance and richness of the Chardonnays by François Mikulski (2007 Meursault Premier Cru Les Genevrières) and Domaine d’Auvenay (2006 Puligny-Montrachet En La Richarde).

2 – You can enjoy aged wines right now

If you’re not feeling patient, it might not suit you to wait fifteen or even twenty years to appreciate a recent find. Yet it’s true that certain appellations require quite some years in the cellar before revealing their full potential. So if you like wines from the Rhône, go for the star of the moment Château Rayas with its 2004 Côtes-du-Rhône, or the numerous 2006 and 2009 vintages of Maison Guigal’s legendary Hermitage Ex Voto. What’s more, Mourvèdres from Provence evolve towards complex notes of dried meat…the 2009 Bandol La Tourtine from Domaine Tempier is a beauty!

3 – The dreamy aesthetic pleasure of a mature dessert wine

How many of us have swooned enviously in front of the molten gold hue of a dessert wine? It’s never too late to try one; discover our selection of Sauternes wines comprised of such big names as Châteaux d’Yquem, Rieussec and Rabaud-Promis.

4 – Show off a bit

Bringing out a mature bottle always causes a stir when you have guests round, especially if the wine was made before those you’ve invited were even born. A word of advice – don’t hesitate with the 1979 Château Lafite-Rothschild or the 1983 Château Cheval Blanc.

5 – Pair them with seasonal winter dishes

The tertiary notes of developed crus (mushroom, sous-bois, smokiness, dry fruits, gentle spices, stewed fruit) promise superb pairings with winter dishes. Red meat or roasted game with sauce or chutney with a 2000 Arbois Trousseau from the Rolet domain in Jura, poultry stuffed with dried fruit to accompany a 2006 Meursault Premier Cru Caillerets from Domaine Coche-Dury, or maybe a mushroom dish with a 2007 Clos de Vougeot Grand Cru by Chantal Lescure – all mouth-watering options. Make sure you’re the first to buy them!

6 – Rediscover historic vintages

Discovering the mature vintages we have at iDealwine gives you the chance to remember some of the beautiful vintages that might have slipped your mind. We’re thinking, of course, of the superb 1990 vintages from Bordeaux (Château Le Puy), 1995 from Champagne (Nicolas Feuillate’s Palme d’Or) and 1999 from the Northern Rhône (Jamet’s Côte-Rôtie).

7 – Bottles worthy of a special celebration

Just a few weeks away from Christmas, remember that mature vintages are also an excellent gift idea for loved ones…or to suggest for yourself 😊 Since it’s 2019, let’s look to the years ending in 9 illustrated here by names like 1979 Château Canon La Gaffelière, Louis Roederer’s 1989 Cristal, the 1999 Les Poyeux from Clos Rougeard and 2009 Galpin Peak, a South African Pinot Noir from Bouchard Finlayson.

8 – Taste the harmony of softened tannins

Recently, we’ve heard a lot about wine-lovers being disappointed when tasting red wines that are too young with emphasised tannins at tastings and restaurants. Turn the tide and treat yourself with a silky-textured wine. Opt for the 2003 Châteauneuf-du-Pape from the Vieux Télégraphe domain, or Armand Rousseau’s 2006 Gevrey-Chambertin Premier Cru Clos Saint-Jacques. You won’t regret it!

9 – Find a good deal!

It is often wrongly believed that mature vintages necessarily cost a fortune. We can show you this isn’t the case with lovely references like Chateaux Maison Blanche (Montagne-Saint-Emilion), Labégorce-Zédé (Margaux) and Bastor-Lamontagne as well as R.Pouillon and Fils’ brut reserve. These are some of the best examples of quality-price deals on iDealwine.

10 – Dare to compare an older bottle with a younger one

The curious among you might like to taste the same reference in different vintages to discover the evolution of its flavour or the work of the domain. If you already have a young bottle of Gewurtztraminer VT from Domaine Hugel, try a comparison with the 1983 vintage available at iDealwine. A marvel!

As you can see, the reasons to discover, order and love mature vintages are numerous and, in our humble opinion, infinitely applicable. What are your reasons?

Explore all our mature vintages here

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